Scotland first in the world to deliver diabetes C-peptide test

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Scotland first in the world to deliver diabetes C-peptide test

Scotland has become the first country in the world to introduce a diagnostic test that can reveal whether a person has Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes.

The C-peptide blood test was made available in hospital diabetes centres on November 1 for all patients who have had a Type 1 diagnosis for at least three years, according to the Scottish government.

The test will tell doctors how much insulin a diabetic is making themselves and will indicate if someone does not have Type 1 diabetes and therefore no longer needs to take insulin. It was rolled out after a two-year pilot in NHS Lothian.

“Diabetes is a clinical priority for this Government and we want to ensure that everyone living with diabetes in Scotland can access safe, effective and person-centred healthcare, treatment and support,” said public health minister Maree Todd.

“Type 1 diabetes is a significant health challenge right across the world. I am proud that Scotland will be the first country to introduce this blood test which has the potential to have a significant positive impact on the lives of those people living with diabetes.”

About 315,000 people have diabetes in Scotland. Professor Mark Strachan, the lead on the pilot study, said the test will give “a more accurate diagnosis of the cause of diabetes” and allow clinicians to provide people with “the most appropriate treatment".

“In some instances, C-peptide testing allowed people to stop very long-standing insulin therapy; this can be life-transforming,” he said.

“If anyone has any concerns regarding their diabetes or wishes to know more about the new blood test, they should contact their diabetes clinical team who are best placed to provide specific advice and support based on their individual circumstances.”

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